Pretty Paula

Today’s doll is one I don’t have to redress. She is quite beautiful and I don’t plan to change a thing about her.

Paula in soft dimity

The dress she wears was described as dimity. I had to look up what that is, because while I have heard of it I don’t think I have ever seen it. According to JoAnnMorgan.com, dimity’s trademark feature is a line in the weave, and a windowpane dimity looks like it has boxes. This pretty dress appears to be of windowpane dimity as you can see the boxes in the weave.

Sheer windowpane and ruffles

The dress is just exquisite. It is sheer and airy, so incredibly fine. The pattern likely is from the 20th century. When Paula emerged from her shipping box, I was thrilled to discover she has a hoop skirt. It’s is a single bone bridal-style hoop, but nonetheless it helps with the shape of her dress. The hoop was completely crunched up, but with some gentle adjustment it went back to a round shape. Her drawers feature some of the tiniest tucks I have ever seen.

Paula’s dress has a bit of a train, or is in an elliptical shape. This shape came into fashion in the second half of the 1860’s, moving more fabric to the back of the skirt. You can also see in this photo the 3/4 sleeves with the repeated three rows of lace trim. The ribbon trim is an 1/8” velvet. It may have originally been a brighter teal color.

Paula in profile

The bodice of the dress features a starched wrap, probably made of batiste. I hesitate to remove the wrap to see the bodice underneath. I am not certain if this wrap piece is considered a bertha or not. A bertha was often part of a ball gown. Take a look at the tiny buttons. They are a teal color. Maybe the are really beads, I’m unsure.

One of the unique features of Paula’s styling is her hair. I don’t know if you will be able to see in these small photos, but she has a braid that goes all round her head and then a cluster of curls on the crown of her head. This is hair styled for a ball.

Another thing that attracted me was the inclusion of a letter from a previous owner of this doll. It was written in 1972 by an unnamed person, and explains the doll was a kit designed by Julia Hoople, and Paula was created by Merry Lane in Florence, Oregon. I think Merry Lane might be a person, but it could also have been a doll boutique. She originally had a yellow bead necklace and a white picture hat decorated with flowers. Those items have been lost to time.

Paula has joined the rest of the gang in my cabinet and I am pleased to include her in my collection. I hope you have enjoyed hearing all about her. See you again soon!

Emma and the purple polyester

Hi, I’m Emma

Emma is another Tasha Tudor doll I acquired off eBay. Someone is selling a kit to make an Emma for something like $50 but I found this complete doll for only $20. Such a deal – I don’t have to build her!

Emma is dated 1974. I imagine she was made around that time based on this dress. It is polyester. Not today’s polyester- this IS your grandma’s polyester.

The outfit consists of the dress, a net underskirt, polyester drawers and a hat. None of the doll kits included much dress fashion – just basic patterns and sketchy instructions. I always wonder about the person who made the doll, her clothes and their knowledge. Did they have a book? And old doll to copy?

While it was sewn competently, it’s POLYESTER! 😆 there’s no way Emma can continue to wear this. But don’t worry, I have something in mind. Since Emma is styled as a youth doll (instead of a lady doll) I am working on a cute 1876 outfit styled from La Mode Illustree. Come back soon and I’ll tell you all about her new clothes from the muslin out.

Dressing Florence

A few weeks ago I told you about building the lovely Florence Nightengale doll from Yield House. Thankfully, Florence hasn’t been sitting in her underclothes since I completed her. I was very focused on the project and spent about a week making her dress.

I decided that since Florence was a known person I would do my best to recreate a dress she wore. A photo search resulted in this image, dated to 1857.

Florence, age 37

Although we don’t really know what color her dress was, I felt that an homage to the somber nurses dress might work well. I found some gorgeous lightweight charcoal wool from MiniMagic.com. They have tons of doll appropriate fabrics, trims and more.

Studying the dress, I figured the original velvet bands were probably 2 inch wide pieces. Of course in doll scale that would not work, so I purchased 3/8” velvet trim.

Secondly, I knew I would not be able to reproduce the turned back sleeves on such small scale. I would have to compromise on that.

And granted, the dress would be made to open in the back as a doll dress, so the sharp point on the waist would also not materialize.

But, I think I did a pretty good job.

Florence, dressed

Since 1/8” velvet trim doesn’t exist that I could find, I embroidered the bars in between the velvet bands on the skirt and on the bodice.

I made her undersleeves from a fine white batiste that I had and used some delicate lace. I am not thrilled with the black ribbon in the casings, but I’m not going to remake them. As was done in her day, the undersleeves tie on just above her elbow.

The lace for her collar I had left from another project. I used a tiny medallion for the center embellishment.

I’m quite pleased with Florence Nightengale! Come back again and I’ll tell you all about Emma and her purple polyester dress.

Refreshing the Fairy Garden

Almost a year ago, Melody created a fairy garden. It was modest, small by some standards, but it thrived under our gardenia bush and we picked up a few more bits and pieces over time. Due to some work we had done in our yard, we have had to relocate the fairy garden. Don’t worry, the gardenia is still beautiful! :-) We collected all the accessories, stones, and little items we had made, and set to work on a new and improved fairy garden.

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Melody chose the placement near a rosebush

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Here she is laying down a pebble path from the house to the garden gates

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The fairy’s house, mailbox, and the path from the gate, plus a little visitor

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A bird’s eye view of the house and path, plus the little garden where the fairies are having a picnic!

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A close view of the house and the pebble path, plus a fairy resting in the shade of the bush

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Here is the “mama” fairy, sitting on a bench Melody and I made from clay and beads

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A top view showing the entry to the garden, the small stones leading to the garden gate, and the fairy resting on the bench

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The proud girl with her garden of fairies and pretty things!

We reused the sides of the old planter box we started with last year. The bottom of it rotted out completely, and so the sides, which were painted to say “fairy garden” were still of use to us. One is in the rosebush and the other is along side the brick border, on the other side of the garden. It will be clear to all fairies who fly by that this is the place for them!

Handmade Fairy

Here’s a fun little activity brought to you by FairyMomCreations.com. We met the Fairy Mom at a recent event. Melody was fascinated by her little dolls and their houses. These are not just any doll and doll house. These are whimsical, dream-inspiring, beautiful little dolls. Melody and her friend Lily played all afternoon with these dolls – see Lily’s grandfather bought them each a doll, then Lily’s grandmother bought them each a doll kit, then Melody’s mommy bought them each a key…these girls know the power of shopping with different people with a soft spot for the littles. :-)

Anyway, the kit was more than we could do at the event, so yesterday Melody and I sat down to make her very own handmade fairy. I wish I had taken progress pictures, but I was so absorbed with the doll that I completely forgot! The kit cost $5. FIVE DOLLARS!  What a bargain.

As of yet unnamed fairy

As of yet unnamed fairy

Fairy wings

Fairy wings

The kit includes everything you need to make a flower skirted fairy, including wings, flower, yarn to wrap the body, wool for the hair and lots of beads and sequins. All it takes is glue and a little time. Took about 30 minutes start to finish. The kit includes photo illustrated instructions.

Whee!

Whee!

Here she has landed atop the fairy house we also purchased from the Fairy Mom. She has a variety of really neat and clever houses, castles, cabins, pirate ships and even a mushroom house. They are so cute, and the sides of the standard type structures come off easily because they use velcro!

Melody and fairy

Melody and fairy

Fairy family

Fairy family

The fairy abode came with this little family. They are so adorable. The quality is very high, too. They won’t fall apart at the first play session. They definitely are not for little littles, but girls 6 and up will find hours of entertainment with them.

The Fairy Mom is going to a number of events throughout California this year, but it looks like the next time we will run into her is during the Huntington Beach Civil War Days event over Labor Day weekend. Check her website for amazing creations, ideas and her calendar. They are worth the $5-$7 you will spend!