Well hi there!

Yes, it’s been over a year since I wrote on this site. Finally I have something fun to write about – microblogging on Facebook just barely scratches the itch, but time has been a constraint too. So, here we go.

I never finished that “girls midcentury” dress project, because well, my girl has grown out of the chemise and drawers I made her, and is not really interested in history events any more (boo). She will go if I make her, but would prefer not to.

To fill the void, I have made another “child” to dress. Everyone, meet Emalie!

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Emalie is based on a mid nineteenth century doll style and the pattern is a digital download from the amazing Sewing Academy by Elizabeth Stewart Clark. You can get the pattern at her website and it is easy to follow. There is also a lady sized doll that I’ll probably get next. Emalie is about 13″ tall, made from all cotton and sewn 100% by hand.

Before I was able to make her dress, I had to start at the beginning and make her! She is made from cotton muslin and stuffed with cotton. I chose to paint her face and hair as well as her little Mary Jane style shoes. Her hair is a red brown and her eyes are green. I could have done a better job at stuffing her, but since she is my first, I will have to accept the flaws. I also think I might have put her arms on upside down. The pattern was a bit unclear exactly how to position them and she just holds her arms out wide for a hug. Otherwise, making the doll body was super easy! I used cotton balls to stuff her, and just mangled them up a little bit to make them more flexible.

Next, I made her undergarments. I used a very lightweight cotton for her chemise and a stiffer cotton for her drawers. I’m not thrilled about the tucks on her left leg of the drawers as they got a little messed up. The scale is so small that even a minor mistake can take the whole seam off kilter pretty quickly. I used the same stiffer cotton for her stays.

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Like how I painted a bun on the back of her head? :-)

The chemise, drawers and petticoat are edged with some vintage lace whitework that a friend of my mother’s gave to me. For the stays, I stitched in the appearance of boning channels but there aren’t actually any bones or cord in them. I didn’t want to get “too” carried away, and I knew I would be hand sewing the eyelets for the lacing. I think I spent more time on the stays than on the rest of the clothing! The stays are laced with a narrow cord. Luckily for me, I had made the actual child sized stays for my kiddo a while back so I understood the process. The pattern has mistakenly forgotten to include the construction notes on the stays. I will forgive Ms Clark because she is awesome in so many other areas!

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Here is her pretty petticoat with a wide 1/2″ tuck. If you ever want to fine tune or refine your hand sewing skill, a doll is a good way to do it. The pieces are small and there is almost instant gratification. I have found I can take very tiny stitches that look almost like machine stitching. It does cause some eye strain however.

Finally, I made her a pretty green dress. I selected this fabric to make a dress for Melody when she was a baby. She grew so fast, she outgrew the pattern I had! IMG_1259.jpeg

Here you can see the tiny piping at the neckline and waist. This is how dresses were made in the mid century, so I chose to do that here. The piping is made on the bias and I used the same cord that I used on the stays. It was the perfect size.

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Here’s the back of the dress and you can just see the green stitching where I made the tucks in the skirt. Fortunately the thread sort of disappears in the floral pattern of the fabric. The dress, drawers and petticoat all close with a tiny hook and thread bar.

So there you have it! Miss Emalie will be visiting with us at events from now on and I’ll probably make her a pinafore at some point. She just looks so pretty, I couldn’t wait to share!

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Handmade Fairy

Here’s a fun little activity brought to you by FairyMomCreations.com. We met the Fairy Mom at a recent event. Melody was fascinated by her little dolls and their houses. These are not just any doll and doll house. These are whimsical, dream-inspiring, beautiful little dolls. Melody and her friend Lily played all afternoon with these dolls – see Lily’s grandfather bought them each a doll, then Lily’s grandmother bought them each a doll kit, then Melody’s mommy bought them each a key…these girls know the power of shopping with different people with a soft spot for the littles. :-)

Anyway, the kit was more than we could do at the event, so yesterday Melody and I sat down to make her very own handmade fairy. I wish I had taken progress pictures, but I was so absorbed with the doll that I completely forgot! The kit cost $5. FIVE DOLLARS!  What a bargain.

As of yet unnamed fairy

As of yet unnamed fairy

Fairy wings

Fairy wings

The kit includes everything you need to make a flower skirted fairy, including wings, flower, yarn to wrap the body, wool for the hair and lots of beads and sequins. All it takes is glue and a little time. Took about 30 minutes start to finish. The kit includes photo illustrated instructions.

Whee!

Whee!

Here she has landed atop the fairy house we also purchased from the Fairy Mom. She has a variety of really neat and clever houses, castles, cabins, pirate ships and even a mushroom house. They are so cute, and the sides of the standard type structures come off easily because they use velcro!

Melody and fairy

Melody and fairy

Fairy family

Fairy family

The fairy abode came with this little family. They are so adorable. The quality is very high, too. They won’t fall apart at the first play session. They definitely are not for little littles, but girls 6 and up will find hours of entertainment with them.

The Fairy Mom is going to a number of events throughout California this year, but it looks like the next time we will run into her is during the Huntington Beach Civil War Days event over Labor Day weekend. Check her website for amazing creations, ideas and her calendar. They are worth the $5-$7 you will spend!