Mid Century Child’s Chemise

I have finished the first installation of practice on the Mid Century Sewing Project as I referenced a couple posts back! The first item I decided to try was the child’s chemise from the Elizabeth Stewart Clark’s Historic Moments Girls Linens 1840-1865 pattern. While the pattern comes with a 30 page booklet, do not let this intimidate you, as it did me at first. It is packed full of helpful tips on making your garment as period correct as you want or can, plus complete instructions for three garments with a variety of options.

I am glad I made this as a practice run because I made a few mistakes and some decisions on construction about half way through the project. First off, I learned how to make the run and fell seam, an historic technique that encases raw edges inside a seam and adds greater strength to seams. In the armscye area, I hand stitched the seam on one side and machine stitched it on the other. I must admit that I prefer the hand stitched side. There is a little more forgiveness in hand sewing that you don’t get on a machine. I also found it easier to maneuver in the small area by hand.

Hand stitched run and fell seam

Hand stitched run and fell seam

Machine stitched run and full seam

Machine stitched run and full seam

I stitched the side seams on the machine and they are very neat and tidy. I like that.

Sleeve finishing

Sleeve finishing

On the sleeve, I chose to add a whitework border. Pictured is the “cheap” eyelet from a local chain store. Even though I measured the opening carefully, I still found my eyelet border to be a tad smaller than the opening of the sleeve. I ended up taking some ease stitches over the top of the sleeve. I don’t like how that puckers there, and on the “official” garment I will measure even more carefully.

Sleeve placement

Sleeve seam placement

Once the sleeves are attached and the side seams stitched, the neckline is ready to be bound. I chose the fixed band option, which is a simple process of basically gathering everything and then binding it. There are no notches or dots on these patterns – something I really hate on Big Three patterns but which I could have seen the benefit of here. Once the band was placed at the correct location on the center of the sleeve, I wasn’t sure where the seams of the sleeve should fall. I took a reasonable guess placed the seam about 2 1/2″ to either side of the center point.

Center back

Center back

Here is where my hand stitching really kicked in. Once the binding has been stitched to the outside, it is turned and then stitched inside. I took as small of stitches as I could and every fifth stitch I took another stitch right on top to prevent the work from slipping. I added the 3 x marks because the chemise is identical front and back except for a small line on the neck band.

Hem inside

Hem inside

Hem outside

Hem outside

Here is the hand stitched hem.  I took a very deep hem because Melody tends to grow up but not out. I expect she will wear this for several years. By the time I started sewing this hem, I had received my order of sewing wax. I used a single thread, waxed it, and again took an extra stitch every fifth stitch. While I can’t say that my running stitch is of very high quality yet, it is even and straight. :-)

Finished neckline with whitework

Finished neckline with whitework

Finished chemise

Finished chemise

This will be Melody’s “every day” chemise, which she will use as early as the Vista Reenactment coming up in March! As you can see, this is a generous garment that should fit nearly any child comfortably. I am looking forward to making the drawers next. In fact, I want to go cut them out right now!

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2 thoughts on “Mid Century Child’s Chemise

  1. Pingback: Mid Century Drawers | Notes from the Melody Maker

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